ALCOHOLISM — A DIS-EASE?

no edit 2018, Mirror Image Edutainment, Alan John Mayer, apologies if needed.  As a lifelong recovering addict of everything from past cigarettes to Zoloft, it is not my intent to offend anybody.

Dear Reader,
please feel free to correct me here if I am wrong or out of line. The opinions stated here are based on my forty-plus years dealing with my own addiction to various substances, my long involvement in 12 Step programs, and a lifetime study of my German (alcoholic, albeit functioning) relatives. My lifelong study has convinced me that alcoholism is not a disease. Rather, it is the perception of the relationship to one’s parents or schools that is dis-ease behind the abuse of substances. While our educational institutions neglect the needs of our children, we have continued to support war. (Thank you Obama for changing that.) Our television teaches values as presented by Jersey Shore, rather than teaching values as presented by Mayberry RFD, or Leave It To Beaver.

It is no wonder our society is plagued by (drug) abuse, dis-ease and attacks upon our schools by people who know of no other way to express their anger. It seems, no attention is paid until a violent crime is committed, but this is the subject for another post. WIth no rights to speak of, our children continue to be abused in many ways, though they may not be visible. I believe it is neglect and abuse that leads our children to abuse substances. One may say it is peer pressure. Agreed, but then, where does peer thinking begin? It begins when children develop closer relationships with their schoolmates than they have with their parents.

While society prefers not to invest in education, many of even our best schools continue to fail our children. Investors don’t have the patience (or the foresight) to make an investment that doesn’t pay off for at least twelve years. Our children should not have to depend on bake sales, lotteries, and boxtop purchases to get a quality education. Society would rather pay the high price to institutionalize teens and then later, adults. We attempt to patch up the problems after the fact with juvenile court, jail sentences, and probation officers, rather than investing in regular school therapy before the problem gets out of hand. My experience in some of the best schools provided me with access to a school counselor once or perhaps twice a year.

We ignore the plight of the homeless and the mentally ill, who since the politics of Mr. Reagan, having no other place to go, have been relegated to infest our streets, libraries, and parks. Continually, our government places bandages over situations that require immediate surgery. What we see on the streets and in our parks is a refection of our group consciousness. Will we ever learn? Will I ever learn?

Our children, the future leaders of this country (and many of Mr. Romney’s 47%ers, of which I have become one), in their inability to find someone who provides more than just lip service, have turned to substance abuse just make it through another day. As a nation, we would do well to take note how alcoholism continues to plague the Soviet (Dis)Union. One can only imagine what Russia could accomplish if such a large percentage of her citizens didn’t love vodka more than life itself. Ignoring and hoping for the best outcome without investing attention to the matter seems to be not only the American way. When one plants potatoes, one cannot expect a harvest of peaches.

The legality of alcohol, accompanied with its easy availability at nearly every corner liquor and drug store*, with all the media advertising bombarding people with incentive to do so, induces people to drink alcohol. Look better, feel better, make friends, be the life of the party, they imply. As dis-engaged as we are as a nation, it is no wonder society has so many dis-eased alcoholics. After more than four decades studying my own character and family, it is my opinion that it is the unfulfilled needs of childhood that turns people to substance abuse, and it happens before many even enter junior high school. Inability of children to find an adult who cares (or is not tied to laws that prevent them from caring) adds greatly to the problem. If teachers were more empowered, they could in turn empower our children.

My study tells me alcoholism is not a disease of the individual; but rather a dis-ease of society. I understand that calling it a disease minimizes the unwarranted shame that substance abuse carries with it. Alcoholism is a dis-ease among people who can conceive of no other way to deal with (what may appear to be) an uncaring world. It is the mind (often of the parents of the alcoholic) that is dis-eased. The Bible says, “the sins of the father shall be vested upon the son.” I could not have read it better myself.

*With drug stores on nearly every corner, (next to the neighborhood liquor store), it is no wonder we have so many substance abusers. Society, unaware parents (and out schools) create the situation. The billions of dollars every president since Nixon has spent on the (losing) War on Drugs could have rectified our problem, had those billions been earmarked for education, but try to get a D.A.R.E. officer to agree with this. We don’t keep kids from abusing drugs and alcohol by telling them to, “Just say ‘no’.” Thank you Nancy, as you call your private physician to make a house call so he can prescribe your “prescription medication” for you.

This writing is only my opinion. Dear reader, reveal to me a greater truth, and I will edit this post to reflect that greater truth. Sometimes, in the eye of the storm, spirit is not as strong as spirits and peer pressure can be. We need to nip the problem in the bud at an early age, open conversation, and alleviate the shame associated with substance abuse. Sometimes it is difficult to accept responsibility for events that happened to us while we were helpless children, subject to the actions of adults. In an ideal world we would all accept personal responsibility for our actions, but then again, in an ideal world I guess alcoholism and substance abuse would not exist). I believe referring to alcoholism as a disease is an effort to alleviate the shame that it carries. Reminding ourselves of this truth through spiritual mind treatment can be of (some) help (if we let it.) Alcoholism is a dis-ease.

Here is my truth. Again, please feel free to correct me here if I am wrong or out of line. Thank you for signing up ten more readers to AmericanValuesRestored.

There is one life.
This life is God.
This life is perfect.
This life is my life now.
I speak my word to heal my own dis-ease from addictions stemming from the perception I have of others. I know I am powerless over others. I accept that alcoholism (as well as substance abuse) is a dis-ease, and in doing so, I release the shame associated with it. I accept restoration of sanity can help me move past the addiction. I know that as I accept, I can take the next step to healing my mind. I open myself to healing. I release my thought, knowing that it is done as I say, because my word is divine cause. For this I give thanks.

And so it is.

Amen.

DIS-EASE

About AmericanValuesRestored

"Glad to have you, Alan," said the A.D. The purpose of this blog, AmericanValuesRestored.com, is to provide thoughtful writing, and direct the reader to spiritually inspired videos on how to teach your cat to use the toilet, how to train your dog to make you heel, and references to the state of Abundance, as introduced in book I of my seven book series, 'A Boy Alone,' 'Obsessed.' Take a step into Consciousness. Check it out on Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Smashwords, and Barnes and Noble. For a good laugh, go to YouTube, and check out Meck&Miao, and Pokey. Some cute short videos under a minute include: 'Tonight's Entertainment.' 'Meck takes the stairs,' 'Meck and Miao examine the new puppy,' 'Happy together,' 'Afternoon Delight,' 'Pokey and Miao fight it out,' 'Meck and Miao attack,' and 'National Boxing Day." Meck&Miao and Pokey.
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